Mrs. Slee’s Roast Duck

Mrs. Slee’s Roast Duck
The Baltimore Sun Game Recipe Prize Winners

This roast duck recipe is the prize winner in the game recipe contest held by the Baltimore Sun in 1911.  The recipe was submitted by Mrs. N. Tip Slee.

Roast Wild Duck.  The secret of a well-cooked, tender and juicy wild duck, with its fine flavor retained, is rapid cooking.  The smallest wild duck should be done in 15 to 20 minutes and the largest from 30 to 45 minutes.  A wild duck should never be stuffed.  Neither should it be soaked in salt water overnight., nor onions or herbs used to “kill that wild taste.”  The flavor of the Chesapeake wild duck is “sufficient unto itself.”

After the wild duck has been picked, singed and drawn, but off the head and feet and wash it well.  Place it in a pan, back up, and lay a lump of butter the size of a walnut on it.  dust well with pepper (no salt yet) and put about one inch of water in the pan.  Have the oven “sizzling” hot and maintain it.  As the duck browns baste well and often.  When the back is nice and brown turn the duck over, breast up, and repeat the pepper and butter.

If the water in the pan cooks away, add more hot water.  When the duck is thoroughly done (which can be told by sticking a fork under the wing and if no blood appears the duck is done) carve it in the kitchen as you would any fowl, placing the slices of breast and other potions on a warmed platter, then sprinkle with salt and pour over the whole the gravy that has formed in the pan.  Serve with jelly made of the wild fox grape or the conventional cranberry or currant jelly.

Roast Wild Duck Recipe
The Baltimore Sun 1911 Game Prize Winner

Roast Wild Duck - 1911 Prize Winner

The Baltimore Sun prize winning game recipe - Roast Wild Duck.
Course Main Dish
Cook Time 45 minutes
Total Time 45 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 whole duck
  • 3 tbsp butter 2 the size of a walnut
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. After the wild duck has been picked, singed and drawn, but off the head and feet and wash it well.  Place it in a pan, back up, and lay a lump of butter the size of a walnut on it.  dust well with pepper (no salt yet) and put about one inch of water in the pan.  Have the oven "sizzling" hot and maintain it.  As the duck browns baste well and often.  When the back is nice and brown turn the duck over, breast up, and repeat the pepper and butter.
  2. If the water in the pan cooks away, add more hot water.  When the duck is thoroughly done (which can be told by sticking a fork under the wing and if no blood appears the duck is done) carve it in the kitchen as you would any fowl, placing the slices of breast and other potions on a warmed platter, then sprinkle with salt and pour over the whole the gravy that has formed in the pan.  Serve with jelly made of the wild fox grape or the conventional cranberry or currant jelly.

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