Mrs. Byers Southern Biscuits

Mrs. Byers Southern Biscuits

The Baltimore Sun Roll and Muffins Recipe Contest Winners
The Baltimore Sun Roll and Muffins Recipe Contest Winners

 

I would call this biscuit recipe a cross between a roll and a biscuit.  The texture was light, but it didn’t crumble like biscuits I normally make do.  I started the process about 8:30 in the morning and had them ready to serve with dinner.  They pair very nicely with this Brunswick Stew.  Although the process to make these isn’t quick, the recipe yielded 15 large biscuits and the cost for the ingredients to make it was about $1.80.  This saves me about $1.00 if I make these instead of buying the already made frozen biscuits I have in the past.  I also have the added benefit of knowing exactly what I am feeding my family.

The recipe starts with making a sponge and letting it rise for several hours.  I left mine to rise from about 8:30 AM and rolled and cut them around 1:30 PM.  I then covered them with wax paper and left them to rise until 4:00 PM when I baked them.

Southern Biscuits Sponge

This is what the biscuits looked like before I left them to rise the final time.

Southern Biscuits

This is what they looked like after the final rise before baking.  When I make this recipe again, I will roll them thicker and not stack like the recipe asked for.  The instructions from the newspaper recipe are below.

Southern Biscuits

The first prize winning recipe for rolls and muffins in the recipe contest run by The Baltimore Sun is Southern Biscuits submitted by Mrs. A. R. Byers of 1405 Edmondson Avenue.

The recipe calls for 1/2 yeast cake.  From the research I’ve done 1/3 of a 2 ounce cake yeast is the same as one packet of yeast (2 1/4 tsp).  This recipe would require about 3 1/3 tsp of yeast.  The recipe is as follows.

Southern Biscuit.  These biscuits are delicious, the tops and bottoms being crisp and delicately browned and the inside light and especially good.  They are suitable for serving at luncheons or receptions, as well as for the family tea.  If any are left over they may be split and toasted for luncheon.  One pint of milk, 1 teaspoonful lard, 2 teaspoonfuls butter, 2 teaspoonfuls sugar, 1 heaping teaspoonful salt, 1/2 yeast cake, 1 egg, 6 cupfuls flour.  Put the milk on the stove in a double boiler, together with the butter, lard, salt and sugar, and when the milk has become scalded let it cool until scarcely warm.  Dissolve the yeast in a little of the cooled milk and then stir it into the milk in the double boiler.  Into the bowl in which the biscuits are to rise sift 2 1/2 cupfuls of flour.  Mix into a stiff batter with the milk that has been prepared in double boiler.  Beat the egg light and add it to the mixture; then beat the batter well as for cake.  Scrape batter from around sides of bowl and cover closely.  Let it rise in a warm place.  For 6 o’clock tea put the sponge to rise about 10 in the morning.  At 3 in the afternoon have a mount of sifted flour on the bread board, about 3 cupfuls, and knead as for ordinary biscuit until the dough is soft enough to handle easily; then roll out about 1/2 inch thick.  Cut with a small cutter.  Brush the top of each biscuit with melted butter, put two together and brush the top with melted butter and lard.  Put the biscuits in the pans, being careful that they do not touch one another.  Set them in a warm place, covered, and let rise until twice the original size.  This will take about 2 hours.  Bake from 15 to 20 minutes in a hot oven.

Southern Biscuits Recipe
The Baltimore Sun Roll and Muffins Recipe Contest Winner 1911

Southern Biscuits - 1911 Prize Winner

Course Bread
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 5 hours 45 minutes
Servings 15 biscuits

Ingredients

  • 1 pint milk
  • 1 tsp lard
  • 2 tsp butter
  • 2 tsp Sugar
  • 1 tsp Salt heaping
  • 3 1/3 tsp dry yeast recipe calls for 1/2 yeast cake
  • 1 large Egg
  • 6 cups Flour

Instructions

  1. Put the milk on the stove in a double boiler, together with the butter, lard, salt and sugar, and when the milk has become scalded let it cool until scarcely warm.  Dissolve the yeast in a little of the cooled milk and then stir it into the milk in the double boiler.
  2. Into the bowl in which the biscuits are to rise sift 2 1/2 cupfuls of flour.  Mix into a stiff batter with the milk that has been prepared in double boiler.  Beat the egg light and add it to the mixture; then beat the batter well as for cake.  Scrape batter from around sides of bowl and cover closely.  Let it rise in a warm place.
  3. For 6 o'clock tea put the sponge to rise about 10 in the morning.  At 3 in the afternoon have a mount of sifted flour on the bread board, about 3 cupfuls, and knead as for ordinary biscuit until the dough is soft enough to handle easily; then roll out about 1/2 inch thick.  Cut with a small cutter.
  4. Brush the top of each biscuit with melted butter, put two together and brush the top with melted butter and lard.  Put the biscuits in the pans, being careful that they do not touch one another.  Set them in a warm place, covered, and let rise until twice the original size.  This will take about 2 hours.
  5. Bake from 15 to 20 minutes in a hot oven.

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