Baking Powder Biscuits by Mrs. Snyder

Baking Powder Biscuits by Mrs. Snyder

Mrs. Snyder’s Baking Powder Biscuits

 

This is a first prize winning recipe for baking powder biscuits from 1911.  I can see a couple of benefits of this recipe.  One benefit of this recipe is it makes a smaller amount.  The notes on the recipe is that this is for a family of three.  I would assume this would make about six biscuits.   The other is that the cost of this recipe is also very appealing coming in at only 65 cents total, making each serving 22 cents.

For help with measurements and oven temperatures, hop over to my conversion page.

Recipe

Take one pint of flour, four teaspoons baking powder, one teaspoon of salt, two tablespoons butter, one cup of milk.

Mix dry ingredients and sift twice; work in butter with tips of fingers or a knife, add gradually the milk, mixing in with a spoon to make a soft dough.  Toss on a floured board, pat, and roll lightly to one-half inch in thickness.  Shaped with biscuit cutter, bake 12 to 15 minutes.  Heat oven moderate at first then increase so as to brown and finish baking.

This quantity is for a family of three.  Use level measurements.

Mrs. E. Snyder 314 Parrott-st., City – The Dayton Herald – 19 Apr 1911

Baking Powder Biscuits Recipe

 

Mrs. Snyder's Baking Powder Biscuits

A prize winning baking powder biscuit recipe from 1911

Course Side Dish
Cuisine American
Keyword Biscuits
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Servings 3 people

Ingredients

  • 2 cups flour
  • 4 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 1 cup milk

Instructions

  1. Mix dry ingredients and sift twice; work in butter with tips of fingers or a knife,add gradually the milk, mixing in with a spoon to make a soft dough. Toss on a floured board, pat, and roll lightly to one-half inch in thickness. 

  2. Shaped with biscuit cutter, bake 12 to 15 minutes.  Heat oven moderate (350 degrees) at first then increase so as to brown and finish baking.  

Recipe Notes

This quantity is for a family of three. Use level measurements.

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